Raspberry Chipotle Jam

Raspberries and chipotles provide the perfect balance of sweet and spicy in this versatile jam.

Raspberry Chipotle Jam

I’ve been dabbling in canning ever since I was contacted by Ball to participate in their Can it Forward campaign last summer. It’s been a lot of fun experimenting with new flavors. I’m still pretty new to canning and had an itch to make some jam the other day.

Raspberry Chipotle Jam

I browsed the recipes on www.freshpreserving.com to find something to make. I was intrigued at the idea of the sweet and spicy combination of raspberries and chipotles and decided to give it a shot.

Raspberry Chipotle Jam

Since my chipotles had been frozen in their sauce, I used 3 chipotles instead of the 2 called for in the recipe. I’m glad I did this. The resulting jam was sweet with a subtle heat that the chipotles bring to the party.

Raspberry Chipotle Jam

Hubby and I enjoyed eating this with some cheese and crackers right after I made it. I’m thinking it would make an amazing grilled cheese sandwich. I might try slathering some on some chicken too. Any other ideas on how I can use this stuff?

Raspberry Chipotle Jam

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Raspberry Chipotle Jam

Raspberries and chipotles provide the perfect balance of sweet and spicy in this versatile jam.

Yield: Four 8-oz jars

Prep Time: 4 minutes

Cook Time: 21 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

2 2/3 cups crushed raspberries (about four 6-oz containers)
3 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, chopped
1 Tbsp adobo sauce
3 Tbsp Ball® RealFruit® Classic Pectin
1/2 tsp butter
3 1/3 cups sugar

Directions:

Crush raspberries with a potato masher. Combine with chipotles and sauce.

If using a jam maker, sprinkle pectin over bottom of pot with the stirrer attached. Add raspberries and chipotles over pectin. Add butter to reduce foaming. Press the JAM button, then ENTER.

When the machine beeps after 4 minutes, gradually add the sugar. Place the lid on the pot.

Place 4 sterilized jars in a stock pot set to high heat. Once the water starts to boil, reduce to a simmer.

When the Jam maker beeps again, the jam is done. Using a pot holder, remove the stirrer and skim any foam.

Remove hot jars from water and ladle the jam in to the jars. Allow jars to come to room temperature before storing in the fridge or freezer.

Recipe adapted from Ball Canning

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13 Responses to “More cheeses I can eat!!”

  1. #
    1
    Yankee1969 — April 15, 2008 at 10:05 pm

    I’m guessing you’ve tried Manchego? It’s my favorite sheep’s milk cheese.

  2. #
    2
    Deana — April 15, 2008 at 10:46 pm

    I’m lactose intolerant too, and cheese is what I miss most. I’m curious about the goat cheese and sheep’s milk cheese; according to what I’ve read, goats’ milk and sheep’s milk have almost the same amount of lactose as cows’ milk. How is it that the cheese doesn’t have lactose? I’d be interested in any resources you could pass on because I’d love to be able to eat some cheese again!

  3. #
    3
    Yankee1969 — April 15, 2008 at 10:48 pm

    I’m lactose-tolerant, but according to a Good Eats episode on cheese, most of the lactose is removed during the cheese making process, so that’s why most lactose-intolerant people can eat it. My g/f is Asian and very lactose-intolerant, but she can eat cheese with no problem. Ice cream (which she will eat when she gets the craving) does her no good at all, but cheese is usually fine.

  4. #
    4
    Deana — April 15, 2008 at 10:58 pm

    That’s interesting. I know lactose intolerance is different for each person. Unfortunately for me, eating cheese (and ice cream) is like a death-wish, but I have read that cheese that’s made traditionally, aged 2 yrs., has nearly no lactose in it. That’s hard to find though. I haven’t heard that goat cheese and sheep cheese have less lactose. But perhaps most goat and sheep cheese are aged?

  5. #
    5
    Yankee1969 — April 15, 2008 at 11:11 pm

    I actually have the GE episode on my TiVo (Cheese: Good Milk Gone Bad) and he says that cheeses that have a little age on them have had their lactose consumed by the bacteria so there’s little if any lactose left. I just replayed that portion for the exactish quote.
    I think goat/sheep cheese is similar to cow in that it can be fresh or aged. I think Manchego has fresh and aged varieties. If you have a good cheese source nearby, you should be able to find well-aged (2+ years) varieties of cheddar at the very least. A Canadian, English, Irish, or Austrailian. All are very good.
    I truly feel sorry for you, as I love a nice extra sharp cheddar, Parma Reggiano, etc.
    And really, it’s not my intention to torture you. 🙂

  6. #
    6
    Deana — April 15, 2008 at 11:30 pm

    Thanks for looking that up for me! I’ll have to test the waters the next time I’m feeling brave…:) I would LOVE it if I could eat some cheese again!

  7. #
    7
    Jen — April 16, 2008 at 9:48 pm

    The only reason I eat goat and sheep milk cheese is because when my doctor told me I was LI, she said I could eat those. So that’s what I’ve been doing. I am very sensative to all cow dairy, but haven’t ever had problems with the goat or sheep cheese…

    I haven’t tried Machego… I’ll have to look for it.

  8. #
    8
    Yankee1969 — April 16, 2008 at 9:51 pm

    I first had Manchego at a tapas place near Phoenix on a cheese and fruit plate. I had no idea what I was missing. 🙂

  9. #
    9
    Lina — April 17, 2008 at 5:12 am

    oh my gosh! a fellow cheese junkie! haha

  10. #
    10
    ttfn300 — April 20, 2008 at 3:23 am

    So I’ve been lactose intolerant since I went away to college… but I still enjoy most of my favorites. Lactaid works wonders!!! I carry the pills around with me all the time and enjoy most of the foods I love. Regarding the different milks, goats milk does indeed have lactose, it is just less than traditional cows milk so more people can tolerate it. I’m sure different processes in which you make cheese, etc could effect it, and everyone’s sensitivity is different as well. I adjusted quickly to Lactaid milk, and they have cottage cheese, ice cream (but i stick to the good ol’ stuff), and some other products I have yet to try. I urge fellow LI folks not to give up your (and my!!) favorite foods!!!

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    11
    madmamma2007 — May 1, 2009 at 12:53 pm

    I found this website of sheeps cheese and it appears it is good for people with LI.

    http://www.sheepscheese.com/

  12. #
    12
    Jen — May 15, 2009 at 1:05 am

    Yep! Sheep cheese is my friend for sure.

  13. #
    13
    Catherine — January 1, 2010 at 10:46 pm

    I am severely lactose intolerant but love food and cooking, so this has been a difficult adjustment for me as well. Parmigiana Reggiano is lactose free as well as; Grana Padano, all Finlandia cheeses including Muenster and Lappi. I use Lappi as a substitute for Mozzarella as it has similar texture and flavour. Muenster has worked well as a substitute for many cheeses as it has great flavour. There are some cheeses that I cannot tolerate such as mozzarella. Goat cheese does have lactose, but also has a protein in it that is different from that in cow’s milk. This makes it much more easily digestible and is great for those with lactose intolerance. Hope this is helpful! p.s. – I make my own ice cream by making creme anglaise with lactose free 2% milk.

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